The Great So Cal Shake Out attendance increasing after Chino Quake

Pasadena Star News Reports additional 100,000 sign up for 11/13/08 Shake Out Event after last Tuesdays Chino Hills shaker.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAaJ_HZsCSU[/youtube]

Are you ready for the big one? I have reservations on how emotionally ready we can be for the actual shaking, but we certainly can plan on being a survivor. That is what the November 13 Great Shake Out is all about. You can still sign up for the Great Shake Out.  More information can be found on their Home Page

The entire event is based on the USGS 7.8 Quake Scenario issued this spring that forecasts East LA and the SGV could be particularly hard hit.  Our own Wil Wheaton gave you notice of that forecast HERE earlier this year.  I’ve been in LA long enough to be a bit cynical about the constant rolling dates predicted for the big one, but still take the likelihood serious and prepare to be a survivor.

After Northridge I learned the hard way you can’t plan enough for surviving afterwards.  Somethings I didn’t take serious enough, like bolting tall objects to a wall.  Other things like what should go into an EQ Kit that aren’t on a list is the tough one.  If you have kids make sure you have their preferred dry foods, formula, diapers, blanky and a stuffed animal in the kit.  Have money, cold hard cash in your kit as when power and phone lines are down your ATM and credit cards won’t work.

eqstrap.jpgIf you don’t have an EQ kit or done basic prep work around your home do so now.  You can get already made ones by doing a google check for local retailers and online sources.

If you do have an EQ kit in place, check it to make sure everything works and food/water have not expired.  If they have expired or don’t work replace them.  Its easy to forget that part when we haven’t had any shakes in a while.

Other things I do at least quarterly is replace the water (2-10 gallon bottles) in my garage.  I add a sterilization tablet as well to keep the water from getting nasty.

The big one that is easy to forget is check the straps stabilizing the tall heavy furniture in the house.  Those rubberized straps dry out and weaken as they get older.  I check at least once a year.  I ArmorAll them to help keep them flexible.  Those that are showing signs of cracking get replaced.  At $20-25 per set it is worth the investment as the alternative is getting beat to death and buried by the big stuff.  The pic is by me, it is one of 3 straps on the armoire anchoring it into studs in the wall.

Two links I like to have bookmarked is the Southern California Earthquake Center  and the USGS Recent Quake Map. Both have loads of information on being prepared to survive.

See you at the Shake Out?

6 Replies to “The Great So Cal Shake Out attendance increasing after Chino Quake”

  1. Here’s what I feel “gipped” on, in the most morbid sense of the term.

    I’ve not lived out here for a major quake. When it happened last week, I was outdoors – all I heard was a pop and saw the lamppost shaking and then everyone in Old Town come outside from their buildings. That was enough to freak me out – In retrospect, I would have liked to have felt the shaking and seen what happens..ya know? I am thinking about participating in the Shake Out in November…god forbid the big one happens before then…but, yeah…I would really like to know how to at least be aware of my surroundings when something above a 6.0 hits.

    – AP
    http://www.proctorformayor.com

  2. Also, I actually fear rioting and looting. Everyone says I’m crazy to think that way – but – come on – you don’t think someone will take full advantage of a 7.8 earthquake – especially in this economy?

    So, I think someone should add “rifle” to their EQ kit. If you don’t think for a minute that Pasadena could be overrun with people wanting to steal shit, you’re wrong.

    – AP
    http://www.proctorformayor.com

  3. AP watch what you wish for. I was in Valley Village for NR, only miles from the epicenter. That was the only time in my life I actually thought for a moment I was going to die as my apartment felt as if some one picked it up, turned it on it side and shook it up&down as hard as they could. I never want to experience that again, but do know it will happen.

    To that end I know where my safer spots in the house are. We have established surface street/bridgless routes home so the fam knows how to find each other after the quake.

    Right after NR there was very little looting and stuff after the quake. The most amazing thing happened, people actually watched out for each other and pitched in to help perfect strangers. If recollection is correct in the weeks immediately after the quake there was a big drop in crime as people focused on recovery.

    The real danger lies with those taking advantage of people with repairs. A lot of fly-by-night dirty as hell out of state contractors showed up and either took the money and ran, or did half-assed repairs, either way it left a lot of people holding the bag.

  4. I was in one of the worst-hit areas in the Northridge quake, and I’m not even slightly worried about rioting and looting.

    People who’ve just been through a major quake are generally focused on their own concerns or on helping others. There was a spirit of cheerful, helpful cooperation everywhere.

    Angelenos tend to show their best sides when coping with major natural disasters, in my experience.

    (Of course, about five or six days later, when no one had had a decent night’s sleep since the quake because of all the aftershocks and the novelty had worn off and it started to seem like more of a nuisance than an adventure, there were some pretty cranky people roaming the streets. :-))

  5. lamapnerd, thanks for backing me up on the lack of looting and people helping each other. Showing our best side is an understatement.

    I forgot about the crappy after a week of aftershocks and little sleep because the came so fast and furious the first month.

    You forgot a lot of us got pretty smelly due to the lack of water and showers. My neighborhood went a full week without water. My building went 2 weeks without hot water as our water heaters toppled. Luckily a friend a few blocks away had both on the 3 day after the quake and we went there to shower and stuff.

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