The Upside of Smog

eecue.jpgBe it fires, smog, or June haze, there’s something about particulate matter in the air that seems to make LA sunsets even more visually stunning than they usually are. Or maybe it’s just that every day is smoggy, resulting in sunsets that are consistently on the sunset-version of steroids. Whatever it is, we ran across this (kinda old) article that explains why our sunsets are so dramatic. And it’s not because we’re cool (even though we are). No, it’s because we’re full of gassy aerosols. Isn’t that special.

Bitchen’ pic by Dave Bullock aka Eecue, local photographic genius and Downtown blogger extraordinaire.

4 Replies to “The Upside of Smog”

  1. Nice post, today it was moisture in the air. Regardless it was a nice shot by Eecue, but then again am a fan of his work so I can’t be unbiased.

  2. I didn’t think it was smoggy today, but I’ve come to embrace the smog after watching Dennis Farino in Get Shorty:

    Ray Bones: They say the fucking smog is the fucking reason you have such beautiful fucking sunsets.

  3. [The Militant facepalms]

    When you look at the Sunset, you are looking WEST. As in, over the ocean. THERE’S NO SMOG OUT THERE (unless you’re talking about air pollution that blows over the ocean from China, which is measurable, but not really visible). You assume everything orange-colored has to do with smog? “OMG, those citrus fruits that grow on the trees out here, they’re orange because of THE SMOG!”

  4. It doesn’t have to be smog; it can be any particulate matter, according to the article (like water vapor or moisture, hence the “Red sky at morning, sailors take warning” adage, indicating the presence of water vapor in the air at sunrise, which I guess could have meant there was a storm approaching). Also, while I am looking towards west, there’s usually a lot of city air between me and the coastline; I’m often so far from the sea that I’m looking across an entire urban metropolis towards the west. That’s a fair amount of air, much of which will have smoke, emissions, a few remaining pockets of June haze, etc. I’m guessing it’s this complex prism of air that lends greater vibrancy to sunsets.

    Also, where did you get “orange-colored”? I never mentioned any particular hues in my post, although the article seems to be particularly analyzing the appearance of RED in sunset skies. Further, where the hell are you getting this from: “You assume everything orange-colored has to do with smog? “OMG, those citrus fruits that grow on the trees out here, they’re orange because of THE SMOG!”? I don’t appreciate your sarcastic, deprecating attitude.

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