143 Million pounds of So Cal beef recalled

DEVELOPING: The U.S. Department of Agriculture is recalling 143 million pounds of frozen beef from the Westland/Hallmark Meat Co. in Chino following assorted health violations. The company’s clients include the federal school lunch program and fast food chains.

Officials say 37 million pounds of the recalled beef, “dating to Feb. 1, 2006,” has probably already been eaten in school cafeterias, but there have been no related sickenesses reported.

“We don’t think there is a health hazard, but we do have to take this action,” said Dr. Dick Raymond, USDA Undersecretary for Food Safety.

A message on the homepage of the Westland/Hallmark Meat Co. dated February 3rd from President Steve Mendell expresses “shock” at a video showing inhumane treatment of animals at the plant, and assures customers that the company complies with all USDA requirements. (CNN has video of sick cows there being lifted and pushed by forklifts. Viewer discretion advised.)

[source: Associated Press]

4 Replies to “143 Million pounds of So Cal beef recalled”

  1. Hello. Nearly all cows raised for beef in America don’t live past 18 months while the incubation period for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE/Mad Cow disease) is about four years. Which means if a cow has BSE it’s rare that it would be one of these “downer” cows — they won’t exhibit signs for years tho it may be transmissible. Sure it’s a rare disease but it’s also extremely deadly.

    The US has had stricter regulations on cattle feed than other countries but what I’ve read says they’re not well enforced and the FDA has been lax about testing for the disease.

    Wouldn’t you pay a little extra to know your burger won’t rot your brain? Interesting story about a farm who tried to do their own BSE testing but the USDA said no:
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/editorials/2006-08-03-our-view_x.htm

  2. How will this affect Steak and BJ Day? The holiday should have never been tied to any particular food item–it’s about love!

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