Anonymous Vs. Scientology gets real

For my second Anonymous Vs. Church of Scientology post of day I’ve got news that this has officially gone from online talk to real world action. According to KFIAM a handful of Scientology locations around Los Angeles were mailed “suspicious white powder” causing panic, chaos, and general mayhem. You know, quarantines and such. The powder turned out to be cornstarch and nothing harmful at all and while everyone is bound to start asking if this is right, if this is wrong, if this is a dumb prank, if this is terrorism, etc I’ve got a different question – has the atmosphere of fear that has been fostered here in the US since 2001 made things like this possible? I mean, honestly, if an envelope of white powder was sent to someone in 2000 it would have gotten strange looks at best. People probably would have tasted it to see what the hell it was, or maybe assumed it was cocaine at worst. But now, in an era when people can be charged with terrorism for making bad jokes, anyone with an envelope, a kitchen, and a stamp can shut down entire buildings. Are we any safer?

2 Replies to “Anonymous Vs. Scientology gets real”

  1. Yes, mailing powder has the intent to scare and is therefore terrorism.

    Yes, if envelopes with white powder were mailed to an organization that had previously received threats to its stability before 9/11 it would have been taken seriously. (Don’t forget the wonderful work of the Unabomber at making people suspicious of their own mail.)

    http://news.google.com/archivesearch?q=anthrax+terrorism&hl=en&um=1&sa=N&sugg=d&as_hdate=2000
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg15020294.300-all-fall-down–one-hundred-kilograms-of-anthrax-spores-could-wipe-out-an-entire-city-inone-go-its-only-a-matter-of-time-before-bioterrorists-strike-robert-taylorinvestigates.html
    http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?p_product=BN&p_theme=bn&p_action=search&p_maxdocs=200&p_topdoc=1&p_text_direct-0=0EAF993E6DEC9F6A&p_field_direct-0=document_id&p_perpage=10&p_sort=YMD_date:D&s_trackval=GooglePM

    I think the best way to battle something that’s corrupt or incompatible with the way that we think things should be is with the truth.

  2. Of course, not only do we not know whether this was a hoax–i.e., that no one from Anonymous had anything to do with sending the powder–but I wouldn’t rule out the possibility that it was a Scientologist or Scientology supporter who was attempting to make Anonymous look dangerous and draw law enforcement into it. Say what you want about Anonymous and their immaturity, but I’m glad someone’s coming at Scientology hard, challenging their dangerous lies and misinformation by gumming up their gears.

Comments are closed.