Perseid Meteor Shower Time – again

My Laziest Post Ever!

Seriously. I just got reminded of this at 11pm and it’s starting at 3am. It’s supposed to be a good one this year.

Of course it’s best to get away from city lights but I’m going to give it a try from my yard anyway – if I’m too lazy to write a proper post I’m certainly also too lazy to get in my car and drive who knows how long to find the darkness.

8 Replies to “Perseid Meteor Shower Time – again”

  1. You can see them in the city, just not nearly as frequently. In fact the meteors have been falling for a while, this is just the peak. The Militant recalled one time when he was driving down Sunset Blvd in Hollywood and saw a huge-ass fireball streak across the sky.

  2. This has been my most favorite meteor events since I have been a kid in MN and MO. I have slept out under the stars and had alarms set to get me up in time to see the peak showers. I have even managed to see a few fireballs over the years. Amazing. Even now here where we have such horrendous light pollution I have my kids with me on the patio to sleep under the stars and watch as much of it as we can.

  3. I just got reminded of this at 11pm and it’s starting at 3am. It’s supposed to be a good one this year.

    Actually, meteor showers ‘start’ when the radiant – the point from which the meteors appear to radiate – is above the horizon.

    The Perseid radiant is in the constellation Perseus (hence the name), and is circumpolar at our latitude, so it’s always above the horizon.

    But it’s also very near the horizon just after sunset, and climbs higher through the night. Viewing will improve as the radiant climbs higher.

    Even so, there’s no reason to wait until 3 am. Any time after about 10 or 11 pm PDT should make for good viewing.

    You will see more and brighter meteors after midnight, when you’re on the leading rather than than trailing side of the earth (which combines the earth’s forward velocity through the swarm with the velocity of the meteors themselves), but, again, there’s no reason to wait until 3 am.

    (3 am was the predicted peak this year, when the earth passes through the densest part of the stream – but such predictions aren’t always correct.)

    And they’re not over – the stream does appear to have peaked last night, as predicted, but lesser numbers of meteors will visible for at least several more days.

    Of course it’s best to get away from city lights but I’m going to give it a try from my yard anyway

    In very dark conditions, you’ll see more of the very faint tiny-dust-grain streaks, but the larger, brighter meteors are easily visible on a clear moonless night, even in light-polluted LA.

    (Indeed, as the Militant notes, some meteors are even visible during daylight hours – but those are larger chunks of rock that aren’t usually associated with recurring streams like the Perseids – they’re pretty much random, and can happen at any time.)

  4. Hi David,

    They were indeed quite visible last night, and may be again late tonight. Scroll down a bit here for some info on my own viewing choices, maybe not too far from you.

    Cheers,

    -cvj

  5. can someone help. On August 17th 2007 about 9:30p 10:00p. I was opening my car door and happened to look up. I saw a large I think meteor it seemed to go across the sky above my house and down disapearing. This was very large and did not seem to be very high up I could make out red yellow and a long streak or tail.
    Did I see a very close meteor or what. I live in Minnesota.

    Marie

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