DVDPlay Kiosks Put the Squeeze on the Rental Market

Has anyone seen one of these DVDPlay kiosks around town? I hadn’t even heard of them, but we spotted one at the newly-renovated Von’s at 3rd and Vermont yesterday and to say that it appealed to my tech fetish is an understatement. I happily put the machine to the test by renting a copy of Casino Royale, which I haven’t been able to catch at Video Journeys. Swipe a card, enter an optional email address (so they can mail me a receipt and credit me for the “rent 10 movies, get 1 free” promo) and the machine ejects a jewel-cased DVD. All for $1.49, or 99¬¢ on Mondays. I’m feeling a little guilty about not supporting a local shop, but the selection is limited to relatively new releases so I don’t think it’s going to put any decent video stores out of business. I’m sure, however, that the Video Hot around the corner from me must be a little worried.

7 Replies to “DVDPlay Kiosks Put the Squeeze on the Rental Market”

  1. I have to admit that between the library and netflix, I’ve not paid to rent a DVD in about 2 or 3 years. I’ve seen a kiosk like you describe (not sure if it’s DVDplay) at the Albertson’s on Venice in Culver City [adjacent?]. The big limitation is the small selection of titles. They’ve got 15 or 20 titles which is a tiny fraction of what you’ll find at even the smallest neighborhood shop. I do tend not to rent that many current titles though (I get to the movies a LOT).

  2. This one definitely had a lot more than 20 titles. But again, they were basically all new or newer releases, and all pretty mainstream.

  3. Wait, so how does this work? Do you have to return the dvd to the machine as well? What if you just keep it? How would they know you’re not just giving them back some cd blank? I haven’t seen these contraptions.

  4. When I went to visit my family in Dallas this past February, my Mom introduced me to these new machines. They’re from a company called “Redbox” and they’re all over the place (grocery stores, pharmacies and some McDonalds). DVD rentals are just $1 a day and you can rent and pay for them online and pick it up from the kiosk. Glad to finally see some here.

  5. DVDPlay kiosks have between 70-100 “new release” titles which have been released over the last few months. Sometimes a new kiosk wont have this large of a back catalog due to it being recently deployed (we dont go back and stock older movies in newer kiosks).

    Fun fact: DVDPlay machines were what was used to test market Redbox installations early on. They have since started manufacturing their own machines because they couldn’t afford to buy DVDPlay out.

  6. Wait, so how does this work? Do you have to return the dvd to the machine as well? What if you just keep it? How would they know you’re not just giving them back some cd blank? I haven’t seen these contraptions.

    Yeah, you bring it back to the machine by midnight or business close the next day. There’s a little bar code on the top of the disc so it can register your return. Since you rent with a credit card, I imagine they charge you an exorbitant fee if you decide to hang on to their dvd.

  7. DVDPlay is definitely a cool service – as is Redbox…

    I have been renting from them for awhile and really like the convenience – and you can’t beat the price!

    Anyway, you can also get free movies by using coupon codes that you can enter into the machine.

    One such code, which they list on their site, is DVD123.

    I also found a cool website that lists a bunch more codes

    http://www.insidedvdplay.com

    I’ve got some free rentals already, so check it out if you want to give a it a try.

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