Finally! A Way To Literally Kill Things ó Virtually

liveshot.jpgJust when I’m figuring we’ve achieved the highest level of suckage we can get to, I’m shown to be sadly mistaken ó and I’m not talking in the editorial “we.” I’m talking each and every one of us humans as a collective whole.

Think I’m being too hard on all us Homo sapiens? Then you haven’t seen today’s L.A. Times or heard the story on NPR about the online hunting firm that has gone live to let anyone bring death from the comfort of their own home. That’s right folks, act now and for only a few hundies and a Live-Shot.com membership, you too can access a computerized pan/tilt/zoom camera rigged up to a firearm that allows you to wound, wing, maim or kill many manner of canned critter that has the misfortune to roam around a private shooting gallery ó I mean “ranch” ó in… where else? Texas, of course.

I’d further express my disgust, but I have to go vomit now before writing my congresspersons to make sure this shit doesn’t wind up in California.

13 Replies to “Finally! A Way To Literally Kill Things ó Virtually”

  1. Yeah, but isn’t this like going to a Chinatown restaurant and picking which chicken you want killed or what kind of fish you want pan-fried?

    For carnivores, this is just online shopping taken to the next level :)

    Sincerely,
    a long-time, lacto-ova vegetarian

  2. I’m not a hunter but the target shooting aspect of the service and the technology are interesting. Though, I’d rather go to the local range and have to deal with recoil and shaky hands which make hitting the target much more satisfying. How long until this idea makes it’s way to the battlefield?

  3. 1. Yes this is disgusting.

    2. Laws won’t stop it, they will make it “cooler”. It just needs to be understood that anyone who does this is a complete jerk off.

    3. Chris is right.

    4. Michael – It’s not a question of “how long until this makes it’s way to the battlefield” it’s a question of “how long until we find out it’s made it’s way to the battlefield”

  4. I have a different view on this guy’s site. Is it for everybody, absolutely not. But let me point out a few facts. This is very similar to using a hunting blind (basically a camo tent where you sit and wait for an animal to walk by) it’s just that you’re not in the tent. To use this site, you must obtain a Texas hunting license and conform to all hunting laws. There’s a guy in the blind the whole time, and he releases the safety on the rifle only when the “hunter” has lined up a clean kill shot. Then they clean the animal (usually a wild pig that has wondered onto the ranch) and ship you the meat. There’s no guarantee that anything will even come into view, you may well strike out. You can do the same sort of hunting by flying to this guy’s ranch and sitting in the blind yourself. This doesn’t seem that different than other hunting technologies, like say a scope that lets you take shots from a greater distance.

    Whether hunting is good or bad is a different debate. I certainly don’t have any interest in using the service, or even hunting from a blind, I’m just saying it doesn’t seem that different.

    I could see how this could appeal to a hunter who can’t get there, say somebody who is disabled, or deployed overseas.

  5. No matter which way you look at it….it’s still pretty disgusting. But then, I look at all hunting as a pretty awful, good ole boy bonding murder ritual.

  6. let me clairify – i find it just as disgusting as regular hunting, but in general am not a fan of telling people what to do. That said, I think hunting would be much more exciting and potentially a great spectator sport if the hunters just shot at each other instead.

  7. Aren’t we playing that game in Iraq?

    If we put the hunters on skates we could call it “RollerRifle” and charge admission.

  8. I agree this is in poor taste, and it is something I would never do, but this is a free country, is it not? How is this different from hunting? (Which is perfectly legal?) I think hunting is in poor taste too, but this is a free country. I don’t understand the difference between hunting and this. The end result is exactly the same. Dead animals. Whether I think it’s in poor taste or not, people should be allowed to do this if they want. Writing your congressman? Where does restricting freedom end? Can someone explain to me why this is something that should be illegal? How is this different from regular hunting? The computer isn’t controlling the rifle, a human behind the computer is. To me it’s the same as hunting, just using technology as an intermediary instead of holding the gun yourself???? Kind of like a slaughterhouse, which is also legal??? Please explain!!

    ________________

    Will Campbell responds (sorry I tried to post this as a separate comment, but kept getting a “comment denied due to questionable content” message… wtf?):

    Clearly the concept of hunting ó especially sport hunting ó is a very emotional issue for me and as Chris so eloquently and succinctly put it, “this new remote predator dynamic” takes it to a level I abhor unconditionally and makes me fear the consequences of one day being able to bag a lion in the Kalihari from Kansas.

    At the same time I see Jim’s point that there are similarities between an online hunt and one done in realtime. Additionally, “T” is correct in that my disgust of hunting either live or via computer shouldn’t impinge upon another’s right to legally stalk and kill or to legally boot-up, log-in and destroy something from the comfort of their couch.

    I’m certainly not one to infringe upon a person’s rights. And perhaps contrary to what “T” might think, I’m against legislating freedom out of existence. But I am also certainly allowed to let my opinion be heard by my elected representation ó and that opinion is that I don’t want these online game reserves operating inside my state or country.

    “T” may insist that I’m talking out my ass and that my goal is still to restrict others’ pursuit of happiness, but would “T” rather restrict my freedom to speak my mind to my lawmakers?

  9. Why am I getting this weird feeling that in 20-40 years or so, the “harvesting” of free-range animals (common and exotic) via this kind of remote-hunting is going to be almost mainstream.

    You can practically hear the guys in companies in Africa and other parts of the world with exotic game thinking about incorporating remote-hunting in to their roster of services.

    And, you can see the ads:

    “can’t afford that safari to Africa, but want the thrill of hunting big game?! “Telehunt” in Nigeria’s Smithson Ranch and have a little Wildebeast steak with your eggs…”

    What’s probably going to happen is the U.S remote-hunt operations will do well at first and then level-off; but, it’s the exotic hunt (ie., such as remote hunting in Africa from Virginia) that is probably going to do some big business internationally.

    I guess this is good news for poor countries in Africa looking for a new source of revenue, or for countries hosting comanies that provide remote-fishing in the Amazon River Basin >_Why am I getting this weird feeling that in 20-40 years or so, the “harvesting” of free-range animals (common and exotic) via this kind of remote-hunting is going to be almost mainstream.

    You can practically hear the guys in companies in Africa and other parts of the world with exotic game thinking about incorporating remote-hunting in to their roster of services.

    And, you can see the ads:

    “can’t afford that safari to Africa, but want the thrill of hunting big game?! “Telehunt” in Nigeria’s Smithson Ranch and have a little Wildebeast steak with your eggs…”

    What’s probably going to happen is the U.S remote-hunt operations will do well at first and then level-off; but, it’s the exotic hunt (ie., such as remote hunting in Africa from Virginia) that is probably going to do some big business internationally.

    I guess this is good news for poor countries in Africa looking for a new source of revenue, or for countries hosting comanies that provide remote-fishing in the Amazon River Basin >_Why am I getting this weird feeling that in 20-40 years or so, the “harvesting” of free-range animals (common and exotic) via this kind of remote-hunting is going to be almost mainstream.

    You can practically hear the guys in companies in Africa and other parts of the world with exotic game thinking about incorporating remote-hunting in to their roster of services.

    And, you can see the ads:

    “can’t afford that safari to Africa, but want the thrill of hunting big game?! “Telehunt” in Nigeria’s Smithson Ranch and have a little Wildebeast steak with your eggs…”

    What’s probably going to happen is the U.S remote-hunt operations will do well at first and then level-off; but, it’s the exotic hunt (ie., such as remote hunting in Africa from Virginia) that is probably going to do some big business internationally.

    I guess this is good news for poor countries in Africa looking for a new source of revenue, or for countries hosting comanies that provide remote-fishing in the Amazon River Basin >_Why am I getting this weird feeling that in 20-40 years or so, the “harvesting” of free-range animals (common and exotic) via this kind of remote-hunting is going to be almost mainstream.

    You can practically hear the guys in companies in Africa and other parts of the world with exotic game thinking about incorporating remote-hunting in to their roster of services.

    And, you can see the ads:

    “can’t afford that safari to Africa, but want the thrill of hunting big game?! “Telehunt” in Nigeria’s Smithson Ranch and have a little Wildebeast steak with your eggs…”

    What’s probably going to happen is the U.S remote-hunt operations will do well at first and then level-off; but, it’s the exotic hunt (ie., such as remote hunting in Africa from Virginia) that is probably going to do some big business internationally.

    I guess this is good news for poor countries in Africa looking for a new source of revenue, or for countries hosting comanies that provide remote-fishing in the Amazon River Basin >_

  10. Being from the midwest where people hunt all the time, I can offer up a couple of defenses for hunting.
    A number of lower income families use hunting season to augment thier food supply. These people usually use the entire animal including the hides.
    Now the guy who shoots an animal to mount it on the wall (a sports hunter) is not someone I would defend his right to hunt.
    But the family that can’t afford enough food for the table because the husband works a seasonal job, it is what our ancestors did.

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