Metro Explains Why Subway Will Take Forever

Yesterday, I asked Metro a few questions regarding their new timetables for several projects, including the Subway to the Sea. Today, Rick Jager from their Media Relations department answered:

1. Besides funding issues, why is the completion of the Purple Line to Santa Monica expected to take so long?

The next steps before subway construction could start are estimated to take 2 to 3 years. This includes full environmental review, approvals, engineering and design. We then estimate that construction could take about 7 years (1) depending on what the final project ends up being & (2) if all funding is available.

The funding generated by Measure R will come in over a 30 year period and therefore the schedules are based on an allocation of these revenues to many projects over the life of the sales tax. The schedule for the Westside project which identifies completion to Westwood by 2032 is driven more by the availability of funding than the time needed to construct. The actual time needed to construct the Purple Line Extension to Westwood would be considerably less than 23 years.

2. Does the projected completion date of 2032 to Westwood include the Pink Line extension from Hollywood/Highland (Alternative 11)? If not, how would that affect the Westside timetable?

Continue reading “Metro Explains Why Subway Will Take Forever”

Metro: Um… We’ll Get Back To You

There has been quite a reaction to yesterday’s news regarding Metro’s construction timetables for new rail lines in Los Angeles. One of the biggest outcries comes at word that the Subway to the Sea – the Purple Line that currently terminates at Wilshire & Western – won’t even reach Westwood until the year 2032. Naturally, a lot of us had questions.

Jody Litvak of the Metro Westside Extension Study Team joined in on the comment section to update us on the Subway to the Sea’s progess. I shot her an email with a few questions:

1. Besides funding issues, why is the completion of the Purple Line to Santa Monica expected to take so long?

2. Does the projected completion date of 2032 to Westwood include the Pink Line extension from Hollywood/Highland (Alternative 11)? If not, how would that affect the Westside timetable?

3. With the city’s population expected to increase dramatically in the next 30 years, why aren’t there more projects on the drawing board, such as a possible SGV-SFV line connecting Pasadena-Glendale-Burbank-Universal-Sherman Oaks to connect with the 405 corridor?

Jody responded by referring me to Rick Jager at Metro’s Media Relations Department. I repeated my questions to Rick, which elicited the following response at 2:39 this afternoon:

Continue reading “Metro: Um… We’ll Get Back To You”

Bus-Only Wilshire Lanes: Time For Meetings

Who needs to wait 20 years for a Wilshire subway when you can go by … bus?

@ginnycase reminds us of the upcoming Wilshire Bus Rapid Transit Project Community Meetings.

Los Angeles, Metro, and LA County are looking at dedicated curbside bus lanes during the morning and evening rush hours. Perhaps one of the biggest obstacles facing the Wilshire project is the fact it does not include the City of Beverly Hills. Ack!

Photo from LA Wad’s photostream

Meeting info. after the jump.
Continue reading “Bus-Only Wilshire Lanes: Time For Meetings”

Metro: Subway to the Sea in 20+ Years

I almost spit out my cough drop when I read an entry by Steve Hymon on yesterday’s Bottleneck Blog:

During the news conference about Measure R’s passage, Metropolitan Transportation Authority chief Roger Snoble said it may now be possible to extend the line to Fairfax Avenue within six or seven years and the line could get to Westwood in 20 years. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa heard that, and super-super-quickly stepped to the mike and promised to be “aggressive” about securing federal dollars to speed that up.

By the time Snoble and the boys finishing tunneling down Wilshire, the Gold Line will have reached Phoenix.

Way to go.

NBC Needs Ventura Boulevard Subway

There is growing opposition to the NBC West Coast Headquarters project planned for the lot above Metro’s Universal Station. Some say it will be too big and create a traffic nightmare. That is why NBC needs to push for expanding rail transit in the Valley. Rail that goes in more directions, to more places.

That is why NBC needs to push for a Ventura Boulevard subway.

Just last year, both Tom LaBonge and Zev Yaroslavsky started to complain that this project was too big for Universal/Studio City/North Hollywood or whatever city your post office calls the area. They claim that this quaint little neighborhood of amusement parks, freeway interchanges and car dealerships cannot withstand such a massive development. It will be traffic hell. Continue reading “NBC Needs Ventura Boulevard Subway”