Militant Angeleno explains how the ‘burbs got their names

Militant Angeleno logo - click to embiggen

I believe it was Raymond Chandler who described Los Angeles as “40 suburbs in search of a city” back in the 40’s.  He was wrong there were 88 in Los Angeles County alone and Militant Angeleno took the  time to catalog them and explain how they got their names.  His post “88 suburbs in search of their names” went live today.  Its an easy read that is both informative and entertaining.

Blogging (in)LA…Did ya know history lessons this month at Militant Angeleno

Did ya know that  near Union Station was the village of Yangna back in the days of the Tongva Nation?  That name means “Place of the Poison Oak” and fortunately the settlers of the area saw fit to rename us to Los Angeles.  Need more history this month?  You just need to simply meander over to the Militant Angeleno blog where he is celebrating 230 years of Los Angeles city-hood with a giant history lesson on the native peoples who first inhabited the area.

He has several posts, the one I found most fascinating was the map of Tongva Villages overlaid onto a map of the L.A. area.  Militant Angeleno went as far as to take that map and list the villages by name and the modern city built over them.  I just wish I lived in one of those cities that had a Tongva name, I’d go as far as using it as my official city of residence instead of the current name…mail would still get to me using the zip code but how fun would that be to pay homage the natives that were here first and confusing stalkers at the same time.

Fantastic Journey: Militant Angeleno Retraces Sacatela Creek

One of my favorite L.A. bloggers is Militant Angeleno and though I’m waaaay late in getting to his Monday post, it’s better late than never giving him a shout-out about his dedicated endeavor to go find the flow of one of Los Angeles old mid-city waterways. Starting from Shakespeare Bridge between Los Feliz and Franklin Hills, he ventures south into Koreatown on a trip to find what lies beneath. I don’t know what’s more awesome: the journey or what he discovers of L.A.’s past and present along the way:

The creek ran south-southwest, behind the Ralphs Supermarket, the Shatto 39 Lanes bowling alley and the Islamic Center of Southern California, then running west between Wilshire and 6th St.

The constant flooding of 6th and Mariposa (pictured left, circa 1920s) was one of the reasons for turning the creek into a storm drain. Sound familiar?

Today, the 6th and Mariposa intersection is home to “DWP Distribution Station 61” and, until recently, an establishment called “Creekside Cafe.”