It Caught My Eye: Cactus Flower Bees

It’s that time of year again, when the neighbor’s tall cactus busts out with its gorgeous night-blooming flowers, and this morning I was drawn to the activity going on at one of the blossoms as a group of bees tried to frantically score some last-minute pollen before the bloom called “Last call!” and closed up shop for the day. I was just amazed at how the bees just wallowed around in there, gettin’ some.

UPDATE (8:10 a.m.): Well, after dozens of minutes and thousands of braincells wasted trying to get the @#$%&&*[email protected] YouScrude embed link to go from FAIL to function, there’s a still from the clip above and you can take your pick fromĀ  the YouTube link andĀ  the Quicktime vidlink.

PS. You might recall this timelapse I compiled of one of the flower’s last year sloooowly opening across an evening.

Covered in Bees!

Hello friends! Companies like Burt’s Bees and BeeCeuticals are doing all they can to assist the Earth by attempting to remedy the ongoing bee problems we’ve been having, from the wiki:

Colony Collapse Disorder (or CCD) is a poorly understood phenomenon in which worker bees from a beehive or Western honey bee colony abruptly disappear. While such disappearances have occurred throughout the history of apiculture, the term ‘Colony Collapse Disorder’ was first applied to a drastic rise in the number of disappearances of Western honey bee colonies in North America in late 2006.[1]

Today, you have an opportunity to do your part! Grab some gloves, and a cardboard box or something and pick up some free bees! All you have to do is go pick it up and you’ll get a large, pre-built hive, no assembly required! Comes with premium Queen Bee, ready to keep you supplied with all the bees you need to construct a beard of bees or attack your enemies!

Picture from the Honeybee Centre.

San Marino Home Infested with Honey-Making Bees

Photo by Flickr user MrClean1982, used under Creative Commons

One wouldn’t expect the tony neighborhood of San Marino to be the kind of place where crazy people let a million bees share their home:

As many as a million yellow-and-black squatters scattered throughout the Stathatos’ home are responsible for the sweet situation, according to Dustin Mackey, a bee-buster for Bee Specialist.

Mackey visited the home on Feb. 26 and Feb. 28 to make a window and a wood-plank floor bee-free zones. He estimates the bees have been living in the two-story Tudor estate for a quarter of a century.

And, after 25 years as housemates, the bees have left a reminder of their existence: honey purging through the wall.

I know that bees are relatively benign, but the idea of my walls being packed with a swarming, writhing mass of bees and honeycomb totally makes me squirm.

via BoingBoing