Local businesses to benefit from quashed internet porn law

The San Fernando Valley’s billion dollar porn industry received a stimulus package of sorts today from the Supreme Court in Washington. The court turned down without comment the appeal of Mukasey vs. ACLU. At its heart was a law, never enacted, which, for the past 13 years, had claimed to have been striving to protect children from viewing  sexually explicit websites, “unless the sponsor used some means, such as requiring a credit card, to keep out minors,” according to an article in today’s LA Times.

Judges, as well as the Supreme Court in 2004, had repeatedly blocked the law from taking effect, siting First Amendment concerns. By refusing to consider the appeal, the article said, “the outcome preserves the Web as a wide-open forum for free expression.”

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2 Replies to “Local businesses to benefit from quashed internet porn law”

  1. No stimulus for the porn industry here, none whatsoever.

    The history of the Child Protection Pornography Act, a Bill Clinton pet cause, is a tangled one. The legislation had no teeth because it only affected online pornographers within the United States while the vast majority of online porn sites (particularly those with illegal content such as kiddie porn) are maintained offshore, out of the jurisdiction of American prosecutors. The second problem, one with the language of the original CPPA bill, was also just downright bizarre: the aim was to protect adult victims of childhood sexual abuse (that was filmed or videotaped for prurient appeal and dissemination) from being “victimzed time and time again” by seeing their childood molestation episodes repeated on the web at kiddie porn sites.

    Watercooler coversation that Clinton must have imagined: “Hey, Sue, I was surfing the web the other night and came across a video that I swear had to be you when you were four-years-old with a pony … except you weren’t riding the pony but …”

    That’s the type of scenario that CPPA tried to prevent. I told you it was bizarre.

    But no, there’s no lift for the porn industry here whatsover.

  2. I’m not so sure how much of a “stimulus” the industry will get out of it. It would appear that some of the adult verification requirements have been modified to make it easier for them to operate.

    My take on the article is that the courts are leaving it back in the parents court to monitor their kids on the net. Sheesh, imagine that, parents actually parenting. My advice is give them dial-up only and they won’t want to surf the net. Makes it harder for them to get into stuff they shouldn’t see as well as download stuff they shouldn’t have.

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