It Caught My Eye: Historic Artvertising

March 28, 2008 at 6:04 pm in Art, West Side

For years — and especially these last few months biking along Venice Boulevard — I’ve spied the substantially sequestered circular Globe A1 signage that’s barely visible atop the ramp and at the rear of second parking level serving the Crossroads Mall situated between Culver and Robertson boulevards. Even though the screengrab below of Google’s Streetview is crapastically bluriffic, it adequately shows how easily missed the sign can be (its location indicated by the Arrow Of God):

g4.jpg

I’ve been curious about it, but not enough to go on an infoquest, until a few days ago when checking out the latest additions to the Flickr Guess Where L.A. Pool. I found a shot of the big bad badge by Flickr member Googiesque who got all up in it enough to show everyone that it wasn’t just a bunch of paint, but rather a pretty fantastic mosaic installation, as you can tell from the clickably immensifiable pix after the jump that I snapped of it while on the way to work this morning.

globe1.jpg globe2.jpg globe31.jpg

With a heightened sense of amazement stoking my curiosity I went Google on its landmarkedness and found… not a whole lot, but enough to quench my thirst for background from an uncredited writer of an old page on the Palms-Village Sun website who posits that the work of art and commerce might have been built sometime between 1929 and the early to mid-1950s on a building that was previously part of the Globe Mills Macaroni Factory. While this is all that remains of the institution, it’s nice that this vestige hasn’t been destroyed. And it should be noted that the Globe A1 brand is still alive, now owned by the American Italian Pasta Corporation of Kansas City, Mo.

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