Gas Pump Robbery – Same as it ever was

335_gallon.jpgI suppose we shouldn’t be surprised, but this (right, Silver Lake) is the sort of vigorous butt-humping that L.A. motorists are now suffering at the hands of the oil companies on an annual basis.

Every November, we swear to throw the bums out of Congress, and we usually wind up throwing them back in.

Every spring, we vow that we’re not gonna take it any more at the pump, and every spring we bend over and take it.

The vicious price creep has been going on now for six weeks and so far I’ve yet to find anything resembling a reasonable explanation, let alone intelligent reporting on the annual abuse.

Just a lot of impotent “Golly, gee, they seem to be rising earlier than usual this year!”

Get on your bikes, people. Explore biodiesel and electric where it makes sense.

Write the bums you threw back in in November and make them answer for their utter failure to put any substantial support behind alternative power technology.

Or you can just bend over again next spring, too.

13 Replies to “Gas Pump Robbery – Same as it ever was”

  1. We are getting a double whammy here that most don’t realize. Our summer gas is partly to blame for the increase. Its blended with 10% ethanol. The problem with ethanol is that it packs less energy per gallon than gasoline does. So we get hit with an increase to add ethanol and a decrease in our MPG. End result is the increase cost is more than just the face value increase of the gas itself.
    The drop in MPG is about 10% so do the math on what that increase is costing you in increased price. Thats more than the shopping math my poor brain can muster, all I can say is that I laugh my ass off when I see those blasted SUV beasts paying upwards of $80 to fill and they are using more than before. Nice to see them really pay for the privelege of being gross polluters and parking space hogs.
    My prediction is that sometime in August our prices will top out over $4/gal and the gas companies will expect us to be giddy when it drops back down around $3/gal.
    Congress unfortunately doesn’t control the cost of energy and has little impact. It belongs in the hands of some dictators and otherwise hostile entities like the Russians, Iran and Venezuela who have realized that those who own the energy rule the world. Wait until the Chinese really build up and their demand increases…world prices will skyrocket.
    We need to switch now to bio-diesel as it packs more energy per gallon and uses less energy to get it to us now. That way when the day comes we can be indepenant of world oil supplies.

  2. Frazgo wrote:
    We need to switch now to bio-diesel as it packs more energy per gallon and uses less energy to get it to us now. That way when the day comes we can be indepenant of world oil supplies.

    You can’t solve this energy problem without creating two others.

    The two other problems:
    1. Where will all our food come from when we convert to biodiesel?
    2. If you think the Al Qaida=OPEC problem is bad now, what will happen when the oil money doesn’t go to prop up Middle Eastern states?

  3. Actually, but for cropping and color correction, I never Photoshop my stuff – unless it’s obviously an illustration.

    This is a straight photo: That’s what the sign said. I think it’s the name of the little Smog shack next to the service station.

  4. Using corn as an ethanol source is only a temporary solution. Vinod Khosla has an article in a recent edition of Wired explaining his goal of moving away from corn based ethanol to other sources.

    As for the notion that we need to continue using oil so we can prop up Middle Eastern monarchies, plutocracies and theocracies, I’ll take that chance given what our trillions of dollars in oil money has bought us already.

  5. Smog Wiser is the name of the smog check shop next to the 76 station on Hyperion and Griffith Park Blvd.

    I agree get on your bike and ride!!!

  6. My comments got people thinking. Moving towards bio-diesel or ethanol won’t affect our food sources, rather it will affect what we ship overseas, but that is an entirely different issue.
    Most of the readers in the city don’t realize that in the farming states, farmers are actually paid to let land sit fallow so production meets demand and prices are stable. Moving that fallow land to energy producing crops will minimize impact on food production and get us on track for producing and using our own clean burning alternative fuels.

  7. maybe the only way to really solve this problem andstck it to the man is to go horseback. does anyone happen to know what the price of hay is these days?

  8. Frazgo wrote: My comments got people thinking. Moving towards bio-diesel or ethanol won’t affect our food sources, rather it will affect what we ship overseas, but that is an entirely different issue. Most of the readers in the city don’t realize that in the farming states, farmers are actually paid to let land sit fallow so production meets demand and prices are stable. Moving that fallow land to energy producing crops will minimize impact on food production and get us on track for producing and using our own clean burning alternative fuels.

    This may not necessarily be true.

    Remember, ethanol has a lower productive energy yield than fossil fuels. More cropland would have to be used to get the equivalent amount of energy presently obtained from fossil fuels.

    And this is just for the energy use today. Expanding economies require expanding energy sources. There will come a point where energy sources will eventually outgrow food resources. And this is going to be a global issue.

    DB wrote: As for the notion that we need to continue using oil so we can prop up Middle Eastern monarchies, plutocracies and theocracies, I’ll take that chance given what our trillions of dollars in oil money has bought us already.

    Be careful what you wish for.

    We can all agree that the Middle Eastern regimes are odious. No doubt about that. But if you look at Iraq now, and imagine it spreading to all of the region that still accounts for 60 percent of our oil, this would be the scenario:

    The current regimes would collapse by popular revolt. In a power vacuum, various factions will seek to play the role of enforcer. In other words, open-ended warfare. This creates a crisis in the developed world, as even European and Asian countries that wanted nothing to do with Iraq will now be compelled to intervene in the region. This only leads to more instability, as there are now dozens of factions battling one another while building tentative and futile alliances of convenience.

    Guerilla warfare tactics teach combatants that are overmatched to indirectly put their adversary at a disadvantage than to engage them in direct conflict. So, insurgents cannot directly confront a well-armed and highly disciplined First World army, but they can make the petroleum resources a target of opportunity. Rendering 60% of the available fossil fuels useless will have disastrous effects worldwide.

    A few weeks of guerrilla warfare can annihilate nearly two centuries of human progress.

    And then bad things start happening.

  9. Way to go wad….opening minds up to pitfalls on our way to energy independance. I really advocate bio-diesel as its energy punch is as good as good old fashioned oil based diesel.
    I don’t see 2 centuries of human progress….maybe in terms of increasing longevity through chemistry but we still are territorial buggers that use brute force to take what we want. Thare’s a few millions of years of evolution that developed that survival trait. This is one of the most entertaining strings in a while.

  10. I rode my bicycle to work on Friday and then again today (from the Los Feliz hills to the Sunset Strip).

    It can be done! It’s good for you! It doesn’t use gasoline! It doesn’t beat up the road surfaces!

    Ride your bicycles, people!

  11. “Ride your bicycles people!”

    Yeah, I’ll be sure to put on my suit, load up my briefcase, and ride in to work.

    When I get home, I’ll be sure to strap the two kids in, and pedal their asses to the park.

    And I’ll definitely be sure to make five trips to the grocery store on my bicycle

    No wonder people think the bicycle crowd is a bunch of nutters.

  12. Bicycles…good option but what about us that have been taken off of bikes as our knee joints are shot from prior injury? Loved my bike but had to give it up.

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