Now Just What Are Those LAPD Up To?

Last night around 3:20 AM I woke up to massive helicopter blades whoop-whooping above our hideaway in the hills. I heard sirens in the distance, and like any modern girl, shook my blessed boyfriend Dan awake to leap out of bed and see what all the commotion was about. He groggily did my bidding as I bravely trailed behind him. You know…in case I had to save him or something. We looked across the canyon, which had the helicopters massive searchlights trained on the hill. It was crawling with police cars, fire engines and literally dozens of police/firemen on foot with flashlights. It didn’t seem to be a fire, but there was more firepower out there than I’d seen in a long time.

So.. What was up? We got online and checked for a police scanner, then the LAPD web-site, breaking news, anything…. but couldn’t find a bit of information on what was happening. In fact, I couldn’t find any kind of online scanner that had current police info. So my question is this. Isn’t
there a way to check online about what is going on at a specific site which has a lot of police/fire activity? I’m sure it’s not that the police don’t want us to know… okay, yeah, so maybe pesky, nosy inhabitants like me are a pain when you are trying to catch a criminal or something… but I was just wondering if anyone had the scoop on how to find out what’s going on when something is going on?

9 Replies to “Now Just What Are Those LAPD Up To?”

  1. I asked about this once and was told I should call and ask the desk sargeant at my local station. I tried, but I got such a bullshit run around that I can’t really recommend it based on my experience. But maybe you’ll have better luck.

  2. I heard the same commotion this morning… in the hills across Universal Studios… then I could have been dreaming but @ 10am-ish I heard about 5 police car sirens screaming up Cahuenga.

    I generally check local “news” sites. kcal9.com, etc. for immediate coverage..

  3. I’ve sadly been too busy to post to the LAFD blog (we remain a one-person office around the clock to serve a City of 4 million, global media – and in excess of 300 phone calls daily… but I digress). ;)

    Chances are you witnessed the collateral impact of a ‘cliff-rescue’ that was reported to our agency at 2:36 this morning in the 6400 block of Rodgerton Drive in the Beachwood Canyon/Hollywoodland area of Los Angeles.

    According to witnesses, an young adult male tumbled at least sixty feet down a steep hillside from the rear yard of a home. Though a hoist rescue via Los Angeles Fire Department was initially anticipated, the pair of LAFD helos hovered overhead (sorry!) and illuminated the scene for safety and command reconnaissance as ground-based crews utilized an extended aerial from an LAFD Ladder Truck in combination with ropes, pulleys and sheer human tenacity to bring the seriously injured man to safety in a litter basket stretcher.

    He was subsequently transported to Ceders-Sinai Medical Center by LAFD Paramedic Ambulance.

    Please know that some amateur photographers captured video and were attempting to sell it to local television news. Given that it is a slow news day, you should likely see it broadcast or on-line. Darleene’s crew does a particularly good job, so you might want to check there later today.

    I hope this information helps. Please know that we dearly hope to bring more relevant LAFD content to the web in a timely manner but remain stymied by factors (tools, training, adequate team) that are well beyond my ability to solve.

    If any of you think we’re swimming in resources, please think again. I almost had to scrape a visitor off the floor yesterday when he learned that we (in the LAFD press office) have to pay for cable television out of our own pockets for the honor of representing the City in live television interviews for breaking news.

    The enhanced web content is on our radar screen, but immobile and far over the horizon at this time.

    Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

    Brian Humphrey
    Firefighter/Specialist
    Public Service Officer
    Los Angeles Fire Department

  4. Wow, wow, wow!!!! Thank you Brian!!!! I am amazed and grateful for your thoroughness. You are the best!!!! And I hope the guy was okay. I actually thought about how cool it was…. regardless of what the issue was (crime, fire, injury) that there was so much support there at 3:20am. I too am horrified that you don’t have more resources. What about putting together a volunteer team to update stuff. Sounds like the perfect ‘volunteer’ activity for people who want to help out the fire department!

  5. Tammara et al:

    Thanks for the kind words. I’m glad to be of service. Please accept my apology if I sounded like we are seeking a handout. We’re just happy to be here!

    With so many people however, thinking that our office is overflowing with staff and technology, saying things like:

    you know… I kind of expected it to be like ’24’ with all those people (then making a computer sound of some sort)

    Yes, I often have to set them down gently when they realize just how much duct tape is actually involved. :)

    But since you mentioned… please know that we are able to accept assistance, if nothing more than someone with graphics skills to help us freshen up the VERY tired banner atop our LAFD.ORG home page.

    Yes, simple stuff.

    Best of all, we can offer documentation for a possible tax-deduction for those who offer goods or services to our agency through our Adopt-A-Fire-Station program… (yes, that includes our office).

    Pretty cool, huh?

    Then again, with so much negative energy flowing out there in regards to the LAFD, we’ve been very reluctant – OK, I’ll admit, at a loss – to figure out how we best bridge the divide. If I could just farm out a PhotoShop request every now and then, or learn how to do it myself…

    To that end, and to make things not to terribly difficult , we’ve put together a wish list for those individuals or businesses who are looking to help their Fire Department and get a possible tax break in the coming year.

    Oh well, thanks for letting me ramble… if for no other reason to remind you all that despite the silly helmet and Dalmatian… we’re not too different from other folks you know.

    Respectfully Yours in Safety and Service,

    Brian Humphrey

    Firefighter/Specialist

    Public Service Officer

    Los Angeles Fire Department

  6. Oh, Brian… thanks so much… I’m hoping that this will get some people to step up to the plate. I, for one am immensely grateful to the fire dept. You guys have always been heros to me.. and don’t let the negative press get you down. You are, after all, just regular guys and gals doing your jobs and stressful ones at that. If sometimes things get out of hand, well, it happens. Thanks again for all the info.

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