The Future of LA Mass Transit?

This mock up by Damien Goodmon is (sadly) just that, a mock up and not an actual plan. We can dream though, can’t we? [click to enlargenify]

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48 Replies to “The Future of LA Mass Transit?”

  1. As a professional cartographer – I love it. Great transportation map. From a cartographic standpoint, I think it looks really good.

    From a public transportation standpoint…wow. If only something like that could happen.

  2. There’s a lot of people who would rejoice at a stop being placed at CSUN. The parking here is hell for those who have cars, and for those of us who don’t, public transportation is a bitch. If only that map could someday become a reality.

  3. I could go to the beach! I could go to work! I could go downtown! People could go to Dodger Stadium! Griffith Park! I could take evening classes at UCLA or USC. Museums! My whale watching class in San Pedro … Drs appointments over by Cedars … nothing I’ve mentioned is more than one transfer from me (and I’ll wager 45 minutes tops).

    I’m very, very sad now.

  4. I hate driving. I would only use my car if absolutely necessary. I’m hoping that one day in my lifetime I could see something like this in LA.

  5. Oh my god, this is the most thoughtfully designed system ever. The beauty of the grey line alone, serving venice, miracle mile, hollywood and downtown all on the same line would make me jump for joy.

  6. Sean–could we get some more info on this proposal? Is it an actual proposal that Damien Goodmon will be making to some government agency?

    I’d like to know more about the “Orange County & 91 lines”. Is the OC one going along the 405? Because a criticism that I would have is that as we’re doing thought experiments, having a transit system that only serves LA county wouldn’t work. I notice that the lines pretty much stop at the county line, and while I know that the complications of local governments mean that an intercounty system might be nothing more than a pipe dream, they’re necessary in order to move people around. Especially considering the huge numbers of people that previously lived in LA County that have been priced out of the area by the cost of homes, etc., and who are living in the Inland Empire now, but who still work in LA and Orange Counties.

  7. This is a Damien Goodmon dream proposal. He has presented this to the Transit Coalition, the Sierra Club, etc. As a civil engineer, let me be blunt and say that this has no relation to constructability nor actual usefulness. It’s a nice idea but he hasn’t even driven (or ridden the bus, or biked)( near where he believes the stations will be placed. The map style is pretty but that’s just a Steve Boland map, and Steve does great maps. Maybe I’ve been working too long and gotten cynical, but that’s the way it goes.

  8. P.S. Sign me up for that T-shirt idea. I’d like to buy two window decals as well–I’ll put them on the passenger windows of my car so people can look at this while stuck in 405 gridlock.

  9. Although some of the points about Damien’s map are true, many of the proposed lines on it were developed and adjusted by others after months of input and discussion/study. I can attest to the Easten section of the purple line(DTLA down whittier blvd eastward) as I helped mold the concept and am very familiar with this area as well as studied the locations/traffic patterns. And actually, much of the concepts are really from old MTA studies. Anyways, that map can start a movement In my opinion.

  10. NICE TRY:

    The cost of buying the land.
    The NIMBY’s.
    The shakedown artists.
    The major ENGINEERING hurdles.
    The TAX DOLLARS wasted.
    The STATE involved in your life.

    This is just porn for New York/East Coast
    transplants.NOTHING about public transport
    turns me on.It’s not convenient.Not timely.
    Certainly not stylish.I cast my vote for a
    low-altitude personal transportation grid.
    Think of the groovy new architecture that
    would trigger.Preposterous you say? It’ll
    happen before that pretty little map does.

  11. I’m not an East Coast transplant. Have lived in Los Angeles all my life. I’ve never been to New York City itself. And I find this map hot.

    Have you ever ridden a [real] public transit system like Manhattan’s or London’s, Dr. Funk?

    And I second the shirt idea! Someone make a batch of these, please.

  12. This is a Damien Goodmon dream proposal. He has presented this to the Transit Coalition, the Sierra Club, etc.

    Actually, I have never formally presented the map to anyone as I’m not yet ready to. The plan includes much more than the map. It also has cost estimates based on grade separation and most importantly an outreach strategy. (There will be t-shirts, decals and a website to help jump start and direct a movement.) I posted it on the Transit Coalition message board and other transit-focused online forums, but thus far at the numerous transit advocacy meetings and MTA events I’ve attended I’ve never introduced the map for discussion or public record. In those meetings I’ve only formally discussed the principle upon with the map is constructed: that in my professional political opinion the current manner of building rail in Los Angeles could be drastically improved, and that the critical mass can most effectively and quickly be built through a countywide map.

    As a civil engineer, let me be blunt and say that this has no relation to constructability nor actual usefulness.

    I think you may misinterpret the purpose of the map. The purpose my friend is to do show the county just how it could all be realistically connected by rail to inspire people to get involved, and to put a price tag on the system so we have some type of ballpark figure to lobby for. Without those two things I don’t see how you build a critical mass to pass ambitious measures (like a massive bond) needed to build an urban rail system that offers Angelinos an alternative to traffic that is getting worse by the day.

    Additionally, like several of the projects currently listed on the draft 2006 Long Range Transportation Plan, which were created just as mine (in consultation and with the vision of simple ordinary Joe Citizen transit advocates with day jobs), when I do formally present the plan I expect to have it then formally studied by the MTA.

    It’s a nice idea but he hasn’t even driven (or ridden the bus, or biked)( near where he believes the stations will be placed.

    Hank, I’m wondering where you got that idea.

    I’ve spent more time on Southern California buses than I’m sure 95% of L.A. citizens twice my age, including most transit advocates. I’ve never owned car and growing up my mother never drove. Until I got a girlfriend with a car I saw most of L.A. through the window of an RTD and MTA bus.

    And as Art pointed out this was very much a collaborative effort. There were three drafts to this plan. I batted around ideas on the Transit Coalition and SkyscraperPage forum for months after I put out my first draft. The absolute first point I always mention when discussing the plan is that 80-85% of the plan is NOT original. They are ideas for rail lines I share with if not completely lifted from other “official” sources.

    For example, the city of Glendale wants a line down Brand (Red line Glendale spur). Current MTA Board Chair, County Supervisor Molina wants a Whittier Blvd line (Purple line eastern spur). The Mayor of Los Angeles wants a subway to the see (purple line). An MIS has been conducted on a Crenshaw Blvd line (Pink line). Valley politicians want a NoHo-Burbank-Glendale Connector (Gold line). Etc. Etc. Etc.

    And in areas like Ventura Blvd where I have visited (I know what all these streets/ROWs look like my friend), but have no intimate knowledge of the surrounding area, in addition to consulting people who live there and fellow transit advocates, I relied on the Metro Rapid maps and paid particular attention to current routing of MTA buses.

    I used census data and population density maps to determine the areas with potential ridership, focused on the areas identified as transit dependent by the MTA, referenced the job density map provided in the 2006 draft Long Range Transportation Plan and dusted off those old Long Range Transportation Plans to insert routes that have been proposed in the past.

    And finally, some of it is finding out where there is the potential and interest lies in adding multi-family high density residences.

    I’m not a civil engineer, but I’m a pretty well educated fellow, with a lot of political experience and I put in well over 2000 hours on research on this map (and I’ve got the grumpy girlfriend to show for it). I didn’t just sit at a table with a map and crayolas and say, “It would be really cool if…”

    But I’m always looking to polish it up. Indeed it is my hope that I would come across a civil engineer such as yourself, who would like to study the map formally (especially that 15-20% that is my own creation). Take a look at the Skyscraper Forum and the Transit Coalition website. I’ll be posting updates and more information about the plan this weekend. I post at Skyscraperpage under “Damien” and on the TTC forum under “Damien Goodmon.” If your interested I look forward to your input.

    Don’t give up hope man. Together we can do this!

  13. so how do we elect you to city council? if/when I win the lotto…I’m putting all of my money into this (and I think I may be a couple billion short)

  14. Hey Sean, thanks for the coverage and thanks for all the positive words of encouragement.

    Really, what I hope to do with this map is inspire the county into action. I feel that though we lack this system today we have within us the capacity to change that as quickly as we choose. I submit that we declare a traffic crisis and begin expecting our politicians to treat it as such. The freeway experiment is complete and the results are here for everyone to see. The one-sided transportation planning for our region has left us literally choking to death in smog and traffic. We must provide citizens with a safe, fast and clean alternative method of transportation and I believe the time to make that request of ourselves and our politicians is now.

    In addition to what I’ve stated in the post above, I’ll steal a clip from what I said on CurbedLA, when explaining why I think this map is so important:

    [M]ost (maybe 80-85% of the lines) are ideas that are not unique, the MTA, transit advocates, and/or elected officials have identified them as corridors that should be served by rail.

    The problem, which I quickly recognized once I got a glimpse of the politics that have us in our current predicament, is that the lines are forced to survive isolated and the revenue source to fund their creation is limited. This has led to more in-fighting than coordination, as politicians and stakeholders claw like crabs in a tank to get the line serving their constituency funded.

    This is no way to get things done. It is my professional belief that the best way to build an urban rail SYSTEM is to present the county with a map composed of rail lines that goes everywhere. Since every taxpayer in the county will be asked to pay for the system (because the MTA is a countywide transportation authority), as many of them as possible should see a direct benefit.

    Additionally, asking taxpayers to pay for short spurs of lines that are far away from where they live, work or play, without providing them the confidence that the rail system will come to their city/community within their lifetime makes the jobs of rail advocates more difficult than it must be.

    Is it an actual proposal that Damien Goodmon will be making to some government agency?

    Yes. When I’m actually done with the plan I’ll take it to anyone willing to listen.

    I’d like to know more about the “Orange County & 91 lines”.

    Those are existing Metrolink (commuter rail) lines. My philosophy with Metrolink is to have it operate like a good commuter rail system should: frequently, quickly and with little disruption to the suburban communities it serves. So simply my solution is double-track, grade-separate and electrify. I didn’t do cost guestimates on that, primarily because I questioned how useful it would be since Metrolink service is provided by more than just the county of Los Angeles.

    Is the OC one going along the 405?

    All Metrolink lines radiate from Union Station. The only Metrolink line I propose (or line I propose act like a commuter rail line) is the 605 line, which sort of ties together everything and provides tracks to get the rest of the trains to/from the MTA’s proposed Irwindale yard and a potential yard at Watson (near San Pedro). But Metrolink politics are very different than what I’ve spent the last 9 months studying and the MTA is a county transportation authority.

  15. sooo… when’re you planning on getting out those decals and stickers and t shirts?

    because i’m going to be one of those that’ll be buying the decals and stickers and t shirts.

    thanks. i don’t care if it makes me sound like a pansy but this really made me cry.

  16. Thanks for the response, Damien. As someone that travels from LA to Orange County for my commute, I guess I can only dream (even more) for a intercounty system. Orange County is underserved in terms of public transportation, and it has some dense neighborhoods where light rail would be ideal. The CenterLine plan has been a debacle.

  17. It would be funny to see how many people dissing Damien’s conceptual map have actually ridden LA transit for long periods of time. I grew up on the bus in East LA and have ridden LA transit all the time I have lived here, and I fully support Damien’s concept. It has also been praised by a group of community activist/transit advocates/planners from East LA that I work with.

    Ride the fucken bus through the barrio a few times and then come back bitching that we shouldnt build any more rail lines. In fact, do that and then try to convince the your fellow bus riders to agree with you and see how far you get.

  18. I ride the Metro, but depend on bicycle for most of my transit needs — a highly recommended alternative, which saves gas, saves money, saves time, improves one’s level of fitness, and which allows one to go directly from point A to point B without having to follow someone else’s idea of efficient transit routes.

    I’ll take the subway over the bus – but that’s largely due to the paucity of busses during busy periods. Standing room only and stops every two blocks make for an unpleasant ride.

    But what’s the price tag on this humongous collection of rails and trains? Is there truly enough demand to pay the operating costs and bonds, or will it be a huge money sink for generations to come?

    The grey line looks like an engineering nightmare, with all those twists and turns. Is it really feasible? Would it hurt people to walk a block or two, in exchange for a simpler and cheaper layout – not to mention a faster ride?

  19. Damien has a sound idea behind this map: the more people that can be turned into “Stakeholders” for a proposed system, the more likely it would be for any referenda supporting such a system would pass.

    Also, if we’re constructing multiple rail lines over decades, the cost for each line would go down, instead of the current system, which is: gear up for building one line, build it, then put into the system, then start on the next line a few years later once we get the money together. If the MTA could PURCHASE tunnel boring machines instead of renting them every few years for each project, the cost per mile of tunnel would go DOWN.

    The only ideas I would add would be extending the Green Line in Norwalk past the Norwalk Metrolink stop and on to Anaheim (Orange County could pay for this leg…they buy the Norwalk to Anaheim leg and get the rest of the system for free), an infill station at the Hollywood Bowl, and another infill station for the Greek Theatre/Observatory (getting to shows at these venues involves HUGE traffic jams every summer).

    Folks, let’s get a glass-half-full attitude here now. We currently have a 73 mile system. After 2009, when the Gold Line and Expo Lines open (which WILL happen), we’ll have a 92 mile system. We’ll have more track than Boston, which has about 80 miles! We already have a system bigger than those in Miami, Baltimore, Cleveland and Atlanta.

    Not sure about this, but I believe after the two extensions open in 2009, the only cities with more track than L.A. (electrified urban rail, not commuter rail) will be New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Washington D.C. and Philadelphia. Anybody want to check my math?

  20. I should have said “the only cities with more track in the USA.” Obviously, places like London, Paris, Moscow and Tokyo have huge systems.

  21. Damien should present it at a Mobility 21 meeting or its Summit. This group at least gets it right in terms of bringing together regional interests and pushing a unified message. It was started by MTA and includes local, state and federal politicians, the Auto Club, both of L.A.’s transit advocacy organizations (no, not all three), business organizations as well as the freight industries.

    Here he can see if many of his lines will take it seriously (read: get study money).

  22. I love the idea so much but like waht was said earlier “we can dream”, can’t we? Being that I’m sight impaired and unable to drive I totally see the importance of reliable 24hr transportation service in Los Angeles. I’ve taken BART in the bay and New Yorks killer transit system as well and I tell you Los Angeles has a LONG game of catch up play for decades to come. Great work Damien Goodmon!

  23. Why is the Paramount Metrolink station shown northwest of Lakewood when Paramount is northeast of Lakewood? And where will the hundreds of billions of dollars to finance this thing (acquiring rights of way and construction easements alone will surely cost that much) come from? Bonds? Yeah, right!

  24. Confused, simply put, a lot of the projects on the map will not get built.

    Remember, the Proposition A and C dream maps are built now, but the more marginal lines are Metrolink services and not urban rail (a few trains a day versus 15-minute or better service all day).

    If these are supposed to be a package deal, all or nothing, then it’s nothing. However, a lot can be trimmed down because by building a few lines that mesh closely to existing bus ridership patterns, other lines aren’t needed.

    For instance, extending the Red Line south on Vermont (L.A.’s second busiest bus line, with over 45,000 boardings) would be a better investment than the Crenshaw/La Brea line (the 210 and 212 get less than 45,000 combined). The Gray Line, which seems to go along Fairfax, could be taken care of by diverting the now-Purple Line from Wilshire towards West Hollywood and possibly extending the Vermont line to connect at West Hollywood. Fairfax does not warrant a rail line; the only north-south bus routes with the justifiable ridership are Vermont and Western, and Vermont would be a better choice since it has subway between Hollywood and Wilshire boulevards.

    The Florence Avenue rail line can be done cheaper with light rail (and not the harebrained Metrolink-to-LAX nonsense) along the right of way on Slauson Avenue. This right of way will produce surprisingly strong ridership, as it will travel from downtown L.A. to Huntington Park, South L.A., Inglewood, the airport area and possibly take over the Green Line south of the Aviation station.

    The 605 Line is too expensive to build as infrequent Metrolink service, as the track is not there. Instead, the 605 should have a Harbor Transitway-style HOV/busway combination from El Monte to the 22/405 freeway junctions near Cal State Long Beach. The project would be “good enough for a bus,” meaning that ridership can be expected to be small but brisk accounting for the fact that no faster bus service is available in this area.

    The Valley cannot get both a Ventura line and a project along what’s now the Orange Line. Since MTA has to convert the Orange Line into rail, and it’s a great idea to have a cross-Valley project (so people would not have to ride through downtown L.A.), the Gold and Orange lines should run through Glendale and Eagle Rock.

    The Green Line extension along Lincoln Boulevard is a keeper, but not the spur on the east end. It should be extended to the Norwalk Metrolink Station, which serves the Norwalk Civic Center.

    The 405 project is a keeper, but this should be allowed to be a busway if the money is needed for other projects. No major service should be planned south of the South Bay Galleria, though, since that area is mostly low-density residences and industries with sparse bus connections, and refineries that don’t add to ridership.

    Also, with what the map has been pared down to, there is still cost savings achieved through reducing redundant bus services. Take some of the bus hours saved and shift those from parallel lines to intersecting lines, and you’d still have both highly used rail and bus systems.

  25. Thanks for the comments Wad. Detailed criticisms like that were what led to the current map.

    Let me get to some of your points this morning (I’ll get to the rest later in the day):
    However, a lot can be trimmed down because by building a few lines that mesh closely to existing bus ridership patterns, other lines aren’t needed.

    Yes, existing bus ridership patterns are very important. But so too is current population density, job density, traffic patterns, transit dependent population and overall connectivity of the system.

    For instance, extending the Red Line south on Vermont (L.A.’s second busiest bus line, with over 45,000 boardings) would be a better investment than the Crenshaw/La Brea line (the 210 and 212 get less than 45,000 combined).

    There’s lots of density in Inglewood and most of it is along La Brea/Hawthorne. It’s the densest part of the city west of Vermont and south of King. South of Inglewood there is real potential for even more and larger high-density residential complexes. For that reason, along with the opportunity provided by the huge median on La Brea/Hawthorne, there is no question that whether the area should be served by rail. The question then becomes how to best tie it into the network. Why not link it to the only north-south line between Vermont and the 405?

    The 605 Line is too expensive to build as infrequent Metrolink service, as the track is not there. Instead, the 605 should have a Harbor Transitway-style HOV/busway combination from El Monte to the 22/405 freeway junctions near Cal State Long Beach. The project would be “good enough for a bus,” meaning that ridership can be expected to be small but brisk accounting for the fact that no faster bus service is available in this area.

    Actually the significant majority of the track is there, and most of the rest is along a ROW. From LBCC/PCH campus to Long Beach Airport the 605 line would require a Cherry Blvd el from PCH to the ROW near Cherry/Wardlow (2 miles). From there it would continue north along the abandoned ROW to Douglas Jct to the ROW between Paramount and Cherry to the 105/Green line to the ROW east of Bloomfield north to the ROW along the San Gabriel River Fwy to the 60/605 junction. There are several options to get from there to Bassett station (605 median, shoulder or el, or even Workman Mill Rd), and I’m leaving it up to the planners to decide. After the Bassett station it then takes the abandoned ROW east of Azusa Canyon Road to the Irwindale station and yard.

    And while it may seem to be “good enough for a bus” the line provides the only north-south rail service east of the Blue line, and with electrified tracks it would allow us to store Aqua line trains at the future Irwindale yard, and allow us to store Green and Orange Line trains at a facility at Watson Yard.

    The Valley cannot get both a Ventura line and a project along what’s now the Orange Line. Since MTA has to convert the Orange Line into rail, and it’s a great idea to have a cross-Valley project (so people would not have to ride through downtown L.A.), the Gold and Orange lines should run through Glendale and Eagle Rock.

    The problem with the current San Fernando Valley busway alignment is that it serves none of the major job and entertainment/retail destinations along Ventura Blvd. For the most part the SFV busway doesn’t serve it. This is terribly unfortunate and I would prefer the possible loophole or future law allow it to continue operating without being converted to rail, and that any new rail in the SFV serve it’s most important boulevard. A Ventura Blvd line would run partially elevated and partially along the southern shoulder of the 101.

    The Green Line extension along Lincoln Boulevard is a keeper, but not the spur on the east end.

    Here’s three major reasons to keep the eastern spur:
    1) The ROW is there and part of it is already owned by MTA.
    2) It could be used in the future to connect to a light rail project in Orange County
    3) For relatively very little money it would allow the Green line to directly serve a few communities with pockets of density and a high percentage of transit dependent citizens (mostly Bellflower) and it would put a major Gateway Cities mall (and traffic generator) on the rail map.

    I’d take the political capital earned for the entire county rail project by having the spur, over a $250-450 million dollar savings any day of the week.

    It should be extended to the Norwalk Metrolink Station, which serves the Norwalk Civic Center.

    It does that. With a station at Norwalk/Imperial, I changed the name of the Norwalk Metrolink Station to simply the Santa Fe Springs Station.

    The 405 project is a keeper, but this should be allowed to be a busway if the money is needed for other projects.

    I completely disagree. It undoubtedly is one of the most important lines on the map. It would provide fast, and much needed service between Long Beach and San Fernando and it would have junctions with every line on the map and it would serve the two greatest traffic generators in the county: LAX and UCLA. And as far as the ability to build a broad political coalition, there is no alignment with more potential: the North Valley, Van Nuys, Westside, South Bay and Long Beach. I wouldn’t be surprised if an MIS/EIR determined that this would need to be a heavy rail line. It should be among the first built, and it is always one of the most popular lines on the map, especially after I tell people a tunnel under the mountains would get passengers from the Valley to UCLA in about 5-6 minutes.

    Also, there’s just no good place to put the busway. In the middle of the 405 it would have to share a lane with carpoolers and hybrids. Also how would the busway to serve UCLA and the Westside without getting stuck in that insane traffic around the Wilshire 405 on and off ramps?

  26. this is a nice picture. i would absolutely buy a shirt and look forward to them becoming available.
    an issue with this though would be having to sacrifice Light Rail in favor of subways or other heavy rail models – and whether or not such would even be possible in some of these areas. we really need to be looking at Paris and Tokyo for direction on this. the fact of the matter is that L.A. is just too big for light rail. having it take 30-35 mins to get from Pasadena to downtown on the Gold line is just silly when it can be done in 10-15 minutes by car (no traffic) or about 35-45 in moderate traffic. moreover, having it take an hour and a half to get to hollywood from pasadena and vice versa via Light Rail just isn’t worth it. i’m a huge proponent of public transportation, even moved out of L.A. to get to a city with sustainable public transport, and would love nothing more than to be able to get around L.A. without a car, but not at the cost of spending ridiculous amounts of time to do it.

  27. Wow… I don’t even live in LA anymore but this map makes me weep with awe. Hey— can someone cranks out some t-shirts ASAP? CafePress.com can probably do this (hell, they make tshirts, baby bibs, bags, mugs, anything). I want my Fantasy Subway T-Shirt!

  28. Oooooh, yes, Please!

    To the plan – even if only in dream for now. And as long as we’re dreaming, can we have it built before the Playa Vista density quadruples with the new developments? But I’ll take a t-shirt if that’s all there is. Please

    I grew up on the west side. As did my parents. So not only do I want this, but I know this is possible, at least some of it. The line from Venice to Hollywood existed. My mother used to take it to her dentist. My grandfather worked in Pasadena, and drove sometimes, but on other days, took the train to Pasadena.

    And do to the poster who talked about “10 minutes with no traffic”. Yes, that’s true. Honestly, though, the time when there’s no traffic? It happens at hours when the businesses are closed. Sure I can get to downtown in 10 minutes, but I don’t want to after midnight.

  29. I just poopped my pants looking at the map and now I have to go home and change. I would support a party of nazi pedophiles if they promised us these lines.

  30. You’re going to have to sell a lot of T-shirts to get enough money to build that system.

    Pipe dreams are nice, but reality is less frustrating.

    And the reality is: You will never get the support of the car lovers to fund such a network. The late Supervisor Baxter Ward tried — TWICE — to pass ballot initiatives to fund an extensive rail network (quite similar, in fact, to this map) and the voters stupidly defeated the proposal both times.

    Even now, the drivers (who unfortunately make up the majority of the voters) will never give up money that they think will build them more roads in order to build a mass transit system that they think they would never ride.

    I suggest that Mr. Goodman and everyone who supports his plan needs to make the idea more palatable to the masses. You promote this whole network and the voters will run away in droves, because they will see how much the whole thing will cost. (That was the problem Ward faced.)

    Choose one line that you can prove the need for, using corridor density, use of existing bus-based services, etc., and then concentrate on getting that line approved, funded, and built. That is how the Friends4Expo group got the Expo Line off the drawing board and into construction.

    Do it one line at a time.

  31. The only difference between the reality of 2006, and the reality of 1980 that Ward Baxter faced: we now have a rail system of 72 miles that already exists! People ride it. People like it. (Not everybody, I will grant, but many, many, many people do). Ward Baxter only had a fantasy future map. We have a fantasy future map AND 72 miles of track (92 miles in four years), dozens of stations and hundreds of rail cars. People see how rail not only WOULD work here, but DOES work here.

    The grumbling from the public in the last 20 years has morphed from “you’ll never build that thing in MY neighborhood,” to “Hey! How come we don’t have one in MY neighborhood!?”

    This is the kind of frustration, desire, envy and lust that can be easily turned into support for doubling, or dare I say, even TRIPLING the size of the system to a more comprehensive one that serves a large portion of our vast metropolis. If we did have 300 miles of Metrorail track, we’d still only have HALF of what New York has, but it’d be a real nice system…perhaps almost as nice as the streetcar systems this city ripped out 45 years ago.

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