Historic Filipinotown, Now with More Improvement

Got this from Eric Garcetti’s office, and hopefully they won’t mind me passing it on. How cool is it that my neighborhood’s nickname is “HiFi?” Seriously. You are so jealous. Unless you live in “8-Track” or something I’ve totally got you beat.

WE NEED YOU!!!
HISTORIC FILIPINOTOWN IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION
Together, we can make a difference. Let’s work together for the following:

– Cleanliness and beautification of our neighborhoods
– Fight crime.
– Abolish graffiti
– Protect our assets * like the Lake Park, schools and small businesses.
– Many more issues.

Come and attend our regular formation meetings:
Remy’s on Temple
2126 West Temple Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026
Every first Saturday of the month at 10 AM. 2005
Mar. 5; Apr. 2; May 7; Jun 4; July 2; Aug.6
Coffee and tea provided. Bring a pastry to share.

For more information, please contact Joselyn Geaga-Rosenthal at [email protected]

9 Replies to “Historic Filipinotown, Now with More Improvement”

  1. I love it! I have to tell the theater so we can start directing folks to our new & improved location. HiFi has a much better ring to it than “Rampart and Beverly.”

  2. Huh. I didn’t realize the neighborhood’s nickname was “Hi-Fi.” Nanette, don’t worry that you didn’t know there was a Hi-Fi part of town. Most people don’t, unless you can spot that funny, long sign on Temple Street or Glendale Avenue, or if you see the manongs hanging out at McDonalds at the corner of Temple and Beverly.

  3. Okay, I’m an ignoramus. Why is it “Historic”? Because there aren’t that many Filipinos living there any more? Because it’s older than the other “towns”?

  4. Hi OREN. I actually just surfed on this website looking for other information pertaining to Historic Filipinotown. I’m the Special Events & Communications Manager with Search to Involve Pilipino Americans (SIPA), a nonprofit, health and human services agency based in Historic Filipinotown. We offer counseling services and a number of afterschool youth programs, as well as youth leadership development programs. We also have community economic development programs that consist of small business development and our affordable housing developments. SIPA has served the residents of Historic Filipinotown since 1972.

    The area is “historic” because back in the ’30-’40s, as well as the early ’60s, it was an area that was highly populated with Pilipinos immigrating to the United States. Much of the population has since moved to other areas in Southern California but Historic Filipinotown still has the largest population of Pilipinos living within the City of LA. Hope that helps.

  5. Hi. Got this from Wikipedia:

    Historic Filipinotown is a district of Los Angeles, California, located between Westlake and Echo Park. Specifically, the district is bounded by the 101 Freeway to the north, Beverly Boulevard to the south, Hoover Street to the west, and Glendale Boulevard to the east, northwest of Downtown Los Angeles. It was created by a resolution proposed by city councilmember Eric Garcetti on August 2, 2002.

    Historic Filipinotown is historically one of the few areas where Filipinos first settled during the early part of the 20th century. Many Filipino-American families began purchasing homes and establishing businesses in the area beginning from the 1940s, shifting away from the Little Tokyo area in the 1920s and the Bunker Hill area later.

  6. Hiyee. :-) Got this from Wikipedia.

    Historic Filipinotown is a district of Los Angeles, California, located between Westlake and Echo Park. Specifically, the district is bounded by the 101 Freeway to the north, Beverly Boulevard to the south, Hoover Street to the west, and Glendale Boulevard to the east, northwest of Downtown Los Angeles. It was created by a resolution proposed by city councilmember Eric Garcetti on August 2, 2002.

    Historic Filipinotown is historically one of the few areas where Filipinos first settled during the early part of the 20th century. Many Filipino-American families began purchasing homes and establishing businesses in the area beginning from the 1940s, shifting away from the Little Tokyo area in the 1920s and the Bunker Hill area later.

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