5 Replies to “Stalinism in Santa Monica”

  1. Wow… I read Joe’s take on his firing and Ruth Seymour sounds like another uber-bitch I know who also runs an indie fan favorite company. It sucks when fans love a company/entity, but never get to know how terrible it treats its employees. Or even worse, they don’t believe it.

  2. the awful truth is that even brave and adventurous media outlets can be (and are) run by people who, in real life, quash the individualism and discourse their on-air product aims to embody. inevitably, the talent on those airwaves will clash with management, and dare to disagree verbally. and, no matter how politely this is done, that talent is then toast. see ya bye. anyone worth putting on the air is bound to be an individual thinker with some sense of self–this carries on the airwaves. and that talent is bound to run into trouble when he, or she, inevitably breaches the stalinesque, tight-lipped culture of silence by speaking out or disagreeing wiht management up front. it’s a vicious cycle. some types of managers demand that their talent or employees take regular doses of humiliation. and anyone with some sense of self will stand up to it sooner or later. so the talent comes, and the talent goes, and the public perceives the organization as an outpost of individual thought and discourse, never knowing that the organization itself is the polar opposite of such an atmosphere. it’s kinda like politics—you don’t want to see what’s going on inside the sausage factory.

  3. the awful truth is that even brave and adventurous media outlets can be (and are) run by people who, in real life, quash the individualism and discourse their on-air product aims to embody. inevitably, the talent on those airwaves will clash with management, and dare to disagree with the boss. and, no matter how politely this is done, that talent is then toast. see ya bye. anyone worth putting on the air is bound to be an individual thinker with some sense of self–this carries on the airwaves. and that talent is bound to run into trouble when he, or she, inevitably breaches the organization’s stalinesque, tight-lipped culture of silence by speaking out or disagreeing with management up front. it’s a vicious cycle. some types of managers demand that their talent or employees take regular doses of humiliation. and anyone with some sense of self will stand up to it sooner or later. so the talent comes, and the talent goes, and the public perceives the organization as an outpost of individual thought and discourse, never knowing that the organization itself is the polar opposite of such an atmosphere. it’s kinda like politics—you don’t want to see what’s going on inside the sausage factory.

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